INVESTING (7)

Regarding his investment the foreign investor enjoys equal status, rights and duties, as domestic legal and physical persons. A foreign investor enjoys full legal security and legal protection in respect of rights acquired by virtue of the investment. Rights of foreign investor acquired in the moment of registration of the legal documents cannot be deteriorated by subsequent alteration of laws and other regulations.

Company with foreign investment enjoys equal legal status and carries on its business under equal conditions and in an equal manner ad do domestic companies.

Foreign citizens in BiH shall exercise the same rights and freedoms as citizens of BiH, provided for by the legislation of the country ( in competence of Ministry of Justice BiH)

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There are many reasons for investing in BiH, such as:

  • Stable financial sector
  • Favorable Trade and other Agreements
  • Favorable Tax and Customs System
  • Availability of skilled, educated and competitively priced labor force
  • An abundance of premises and sites, industrial zones, free trade zones
  • Foreign Investor Support Fund etc.

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Foreign investors concerned about risks of transfer restrictions, expropriation, war and civil disturbance and denial of justice, can be insured against these risks with the European Union Investment Guarantee Trust Fund for Bosnia and Herzegovina, administered by the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA, member of the World Bank Group).

BiH is eligible for assistance from the US Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC), which also provides political risk insurance for investors.

 

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Corporate income tax rate is 10 % on the whole territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Personal Income Tax- from 5,5 % to 30%

Property tax. – From 3-8 %

Value Added Tax – 17 %

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Work permits for foreign investors are issued on the basis of residence permit.

Work permits are issued by the authorized Employment Offices for the maximum period of up to one year and can be extended.

The employer should apply for work permits for their foreign employees. Work permits are issued for the person for specified position and with specified employer for specified period of time. The employment of foreign national will be permitted if he is qualified for the position and if no unemployment citizen of BiH can be found to fill the vacancy. With the termination of employment, the corresponding work permit is invalidated.

The permit evaluation process needs to be completed 7 days upon the submission of required documents.

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Money transfer to Bosnia and Herzegovina goes through banks directly or via intermediary banks, depending on the sender’s location.

Cash that exceeds 10.000 EUR must be reported at the border or airport.

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  • Foreign investors are protected against nationalization, expropriation, requisition or measures having similar effects; such measures may take place only in the public interest in accordance with the applicable laws and regulations and against the payment of an appropriate compensation, i.e. compensation that is adequate, effective and prompt.
  • National treatment of foreign investors, i.e, foreign investors have the same rights and obligations as residents of B&H.
  • Foreign investors are entitled to open accounts in any commercial bank in domestic and/or any freely convertible currency on the territory of B&H.
  • Foreign investors are entitled to freely employ foreign nationals, subject to the labour and immigration laws in B&H.
  • Foreign investors are entitled to transfer abroad, freely and without delay, in convertible currency, proceeds resulting from their investment in B&H
  • Foreign investors may own real estate in B&H. Foreign investors enjoy the same property rights in respect to real estate as B&H legal entities.
  • The rights and benefits of foreign investors granted and obligations imposed by the Law on the Policy of Foreign Direct Investment (mentioned above) cannot be terminated or overruled by subsequent laws and regulations. Should a subsequent law or regulation be more favorable to foreign investors, the investor will have the right to choose the regime by which the investment will be regulated.
  • Full corporate income tax exemption for companies whose exports exceed 30% of total income (turnover)
  • Companies investing not less than  20 million BAM over five consecutive years in production, provided the investment during the first year is at least  4 million BAM .
  • A company, whose workforce is comprised more than 50% of persons with disabilities or special needs hired for a period longer than one year, is exempt from corporate income tax for that year.
  • Foreign investors concerned about risks of transfer restrictions, expropriation, war and civil disturbances and denial of justice, can be insured against these risks with the European Union Investment Guarantee Trust Fund for Bosnia and Herzegovina, administered by the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA, member of the World Bank Group).

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GENERAL (6)

Main Economic Indicators 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Nominal GDP (EUR billion) 11.5 13.0 12.7 13,0 13,4 13,4 13,7 14,0 14,6
GDP per capita (EUR) 3,000 3,394 3,297 3,372 3,490 3,491 3,568 3,648 3,821
Real GDP growth rate (%) 5.7 5.5 -2.9 0.8 0.9 -0.9 2.4 1.1 3.03
Industrial production growth rate (%) 10.0 9.2 -3.3 1.6 5.6 -5.2 6.7 0.1 2.6
Net average wages (EUR) 322 385 404 408 417 422 423 424 424
Annual inflation rate (%) 1.5 7.4 -0.4 2.1 3.7 2.1 -0.1 -0.9 -1.0
Annual unemployment rate (%) 29.0 23.4 24.1 27.2 27.6 28.0 27.5 27.5 27.7
Official FX reserves (EUR million) 3,425 3,219 3,176 3,301 3,284 3,328 3,614 4,001 4,400
Trade Balance (EUR billion) -4.14 -4.82 -3.48 -3.33 -3.73 -3.78 -3.47 -3.84 -3.51
FDI flows (EUR million) 1,329 684 180 307 357 307 228 378 244
FDI as a % of GDP 11.6 5.3 1.4 2.4 2.7 2.3 1.7 2.7 1.7
Deposits of citizens in commercial banks (EUR million) 2,622 2,633 2,793 3,251 3,605 3,914 4,276 4,623 5,044
EUR / LCY (avg.) 1.96 1.96 1.96 1,96 1,96 1,96 1,96 1,96 1,96
USD / LCY (avg.) 1.43 1.33 1.40 1,47 1,41 1,52 1,47 1,47 1,76
Source: Central bank of B&H and Agency for Statistics of B&H

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Official name: Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH)
Area:  51.209,2 km2 (51.197 km2 land; 12, 2 km2 sea)
Population: 3,5 million

Capital city: Sarajevo
Other major cities: Banja Luka, Bihac, Mostar, Tuzla, Zenica
Religions: Muslim (50,7%), Orthodox Christian (30,74%), Roman Catholic (15,18 %), Others (3,35%)
Ethnic groups: Bosniaks, Serbs, Croats and others
Languages: Bosnian, Serbian, Croatian (all official)
Administrative organization: BiH comprises of two entities: the Federation of BiH and Republika Srpska. Formally part of both entities is the Brcko District, a multi-ethnic self-governing administrative unit.
Government structure: BiH is a parliamentary democracy with a bicameral parliament (House of Representatives and House of Peoples), a three-member rotating presidency, a Council of Ministers, and Constitutional Court.

Age structure:

0-14 years: 15,3%
15-64 years: 70,3%
65 years and over: 14,2%

Population growth rate: -0,0023% (2015 est.)

GDP:  14,6 bil EUR (2015)
GDP per capita: 3.821 EUR  (2015)
Currency: Convertible Mark (BAM – official; KM – common use)
Exchange rate: 1 EUR = KM 1,95 (fixed exchange rate)
Tax jurisdictions: There are two main tax jurisdictions in BiH: the Federation of BiH (FBiH), with 10 cantons, and the Republika Srpska (RS)
Latitude/longitude: 44 N, 18 E
Time zone: CET (GMT + 1 hour)
Internet domain:  .ba
Internacional telephone code:  +387

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Residence and movement of foreign nationals in BiH is regulated by the Law on Movement and Residence of Foreigners and Exile.

A temporary residence permit is issued by the authorized Ministry of Interior Affairs for a period of up to one year and can be extended. If the residence permit is issued on the basis of employment agreement, its validity is directly linked to the work permit. Since the first residence permit can be issued for one year only, foreign employee needs to extend both his work and residence permits, once that period expires.

If a foreign national intends to reside in BiH with his/her spouse and/or children, this must be mentioned in the application for the first residence permit.

A permanent residence permit can be issued to a foreign national on the basis of temporary residence of at least 5 years of continuous residence in BiH.

 

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Work permits for foreign investors are issued on the basis of residence permit.

Work permits are issued by the authorized Employment Offices for the maximum period of up to one year and can be extended.

The employer should apply for work permits for their foreign employees. Work permits are issued for the person for specified position and with specified employer for specified period of time. The employment of foreign national will be permitted if he is qualified for the position and if no unemployment citizen of BiH can be found to fill the vacancy. With the termination of employment, the corresponding work permit is invalidated.

The permit evaluation process needs to be completed 7 days upon the submission of required documents.

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Ministry of Security is in charge of the implementation of immigration and asylum in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and is responsible for the regulation of procedures and methods of organizing services dealing with the issues of the movement and stay of aliens. The headquarters of the Ministry of Security is seated in the town of Sarajevo at the address Trg Bosnia and Herzegovina 1.

Asylum Sector performs administrative and other professional tasks related to the execution and implementation of policy and asylum procedure in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Immigration Sector is responsible for delivering second instance decisions on appeals of aliens on the decisions issued the Service for Foreigners’ Affairs and the Border Police.

Border Police of Bosnia and Herzegovina is one of the administrative organizations within the Ministry of Security, with its operational autonomy, established to perform police tasks related to monitoring and control of Bosnia and Herzegovina border crossing points and other duties as prescribed by law.

Service for Foreigners’ Affairs, as one of the administrative organizations within the Ministry of Security, with its operational autonomy, is tasked with performing administrative tasks related to the movement and stay of aliens in Bosnia and Herzegovina in accordance with the Rulebook of the Law on Movement and Stay of Aliens and Asylum. Organizational units of the Service for Foreigners’ Affairs are the following field offices: Sarajevo, East Sarajevo, Banja Luka, Mostar, Zenica, Travnik, Bijeljina, Trebinje, Gorazde, Tuzla, Livno, Ljubuski, Orasje, Bihac, Brcko, and Doboj.

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Non-visa stay is the right of stay for foreigners coming from countries with visa-free travel of up to 90 days within any period of 180 days, which means, taking into account the period of 180 days prior to each day of stay, unless otherwise determined by an international treaty to which BiH is a party.

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LAND / REAL ESTATE (8)

Foreign investors have the same property rights in respect to real estates as the citizens of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Foreign citizen can buy property (land, house, apartment) in Bosnia and Herzegovina in accordance with the existence or absence of reciprocity in terms of acquiring the real estates.

 

The list of countries, reciprocity in acquiring title to real-estate and property in the Federation BiH:

lista_zemalja_reciprocitet_u_stanju_prava_vlasnistva_na_nekretninama

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After the signing of a sales contract and the certification of signatures of the contracting parties by the public notary, the land and new owner are registered in the Land Register.

Requests for land registry extracts, as well as requests for alterations in land register records, are submitted to the land register offices located in courts, specifically municipal courts in FBiH and basic courts in RS.

If some of the data necessary for submitting a request are unknown, e.g. plot number, land register folder, cadastre municipality name, these can easily be obtained in the land register office.

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Foreign investors can insure their properties at many insurance companies. For a list of leading insurance companies in Bi, please contact FIPA (Foreign Investment Promotion Agency BiH).

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A foreign investor/citizen can rent their BiH property without any requirement to obtain a rental license from the authorities.

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Real estate agents exist in major cities and towns, operating in a transparent, competitive environment. For a list of reputable agents please contact FIPA directly.

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Leasing office space:

5 – 50 EUR/m2

Buying office space:

Central position 1500 – 3500 EUR/m2

Peripheral position 700 – 2000 EUR/m2

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Buying land: 10 – 100 EUR/m2

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Leasing: 2 – 10 EUR/m2

Buying: 50 – 1000 EUR/m2

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TOURISM (2)

Tourism in Bosnia and Herzegovina is a fast-growing sector making up an important part in the economy of the country. The tourist business environment is constantly developing with an increasingly active tourism promotional system.

Bosnia and Herzegovina has been a top performer in recent years in terms of tourism development; tourist arrivals have grown by an average of 24% annually from 1995 to 2000. The European region’s solid growth in arrivals in 2007 was due in significant part to Southern and Mediterranean Europe’s strong performance (+7%). In particular, Bosnia and Herzegovina were among the stronger players with a growth of 20%.[1] In 2013, the World Economic Forum reported in its Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Report that Bosnia and Herzegovina was the world’s eighth friendliest nation towards tourists.[2]

In 2015 Bosnia and Herzegovina surpassed 1 million arrivals and continued the growth in 2016 recording 1.148.530 arrivals (+11,6%) combined with 2.376.743 overnight stay (+10,9%). 67,6% of the tourist arrivals and 69% of the overnight stays came from foreign countries.[3] According to an estimate of the World Tourism Organization, Bosnia and Herzegovina will have the third highest tourism growth rate in the world between 1995 and 2020. The major sending countries in 2016 have been Croatia (11% arrivals, 11,9% nights), Serbia (8,9% arrivals, 8,4% nights), Turkey (10,7% arrivals, 8,0% nights), Slovenia (6,5% arrivals, 6,0% nights) and Italy (5,4% arrivals, 6,5% nights).[4] Furthermore, it is estimated that over 1 million people visit Međugorje every year but the vast majority goes unregistered by the accommodation providers.

The travel guide series, Lonely Planet, has named Sarajevo as the 43rd best city in the world,[5] and in December 2009 listed Sarajevo as one of the top ten cities to visit in 2010.[6] With its #43 spot Sarajevo has come ahead of Dubrovnik, #59, Ljubljana at #84, Bled at #90, Zagreb at #125 and Belgrade at #143, making Sarajevo the best ranking city on the Balkan peninsula behind AthensGreece.

Tourism in Sarajevo is chiefly focused on historical, religious, and cultural aspects. In recent years investments has made it a popular shopping city as well, with a respectable offer in retail shopping. It hosted the 1984 Winter Olympics, which, at the time, were the largest Winter Games ever (in terms of athletes and media).

The country is regaining its reputation as an excellent ski destination with its Olympic mountains such as BjelašnicaIgman and Jahorina.

 

MORE INFO ON: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism_in_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina

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15 Best Places to Visit in Bosnia and Herzegovina

1. Travnik

Travnik Castle

Source: flickr

Travnik Castle

Bisected by the babbling Lasva River as it flows through the central mountains of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the pretty mid-sized town of Travnik does well to balance its interesting past as the capital and stronghold of the erstwhile viziers of this old Ottoman sub-region and modern day adventure sports and outdoorsy draws. The first aspect manifests in a curious array of traditional eastern-style edifices and monuments, two Ottoman clock towers (unique throughout the country) and a handsome 15th-century old town heart. The second aspect makes its home on the slopes of Vlasic Mountain on the horizon, which is now one of Bosnia’s most celebrated skiing, Nordic walking and hiking destinations.

 

2. Jahorina

Jahorina

Source: flickr

Jahorina

Home to the best-loved ski field in all of Bosnia and former host of the Winter Olympics, Jahorina draws snow lovers and summertime hikers alike to its high perch amidst the pine-spotted upper levels of the Dinaric Alps. Of course it’s the lifts and pistes here that take centre stage for most travelers, with no fewer than 10 chairs and a planned gondola serving 30 kilometers of groomed alpine runs. But Jahorina isn’t only for when the snow falls; not with the hunting lodges and pre-historic wonders of the Orlovaca cave system nearby, along with the pretty town of Pale beckoning from the valley below.

 

3. Sarajevo

Sarajevo

Source: flickr

Sarajevo

A bustling, bubbling and surprising European capital that’s now heading full throttle into the modern age, Sarajevo has all but shed its former reputation as a ravaged war zone. Memorials to the fallen and killed from the tumultuous conflicts of the 1990s do still fringe the city’s districts, but there’s certainly a newfound confidence and panache flowing through the central streets; one that embodies a real defiance for the atrocities of war. Think striking mosques looming over al fresco beer bars, aromatic Turkic restaurants peppering enchanting bazaars, pretty city parks and arched stone bridges, all underpinned by modern art museums, jazz fests and more!

 

4. Trebinje

Trebinje

Source: flickr

Trebinje

One of the real gems of the Republika Srpska side of Bosnia Herzegovina, Trebinje reflects beautifully against the waters of the winding Trebisnjica River as it cuts through the heart of the city’s historic centre; a medley of elegant Ottoman rises and original eastern facades that was constructed largely in the 18th century. There’s also the pretty arched bridge of Arslanagic to see on the edge of town, along with a gorgeous Serbian Orthodox cathedral on the ridges above. Travelers should also be sure to scale to the crumbling remnants of the Klobuk fortress on the hill, which offers sweeping views of the Trebisnjica River valley.

5. Stolac

Stolac

Source: daniplanaslabad

Stolac

Hemmed in by the grass-green and craggy ridges of the Herzegovina Humina, Stolac is considered by many to be single most beautiful town in the country. Amidst its enchanting old heart, the spot fuses layer after layer of unique architectural and cultural heritage, going from the crumbling remnants of Roman Diluntum that stood here in the 3rd century to the elegance of Austro-Hungarian Baroque. Then there are the haunting tombstones of the Radimlja necropolis on the edge of the town to see, along with the pretty riparian stretches of the Bregava River, complete with clicking wooden watermills and real-stone bridges.

6. Mostar

Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Source: flickr

Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina

One of the undisputed jewels of the entire Balkan Peninsula, Mostar oozes Bosnian history from each of its Byzantine cracks, Slavic crevices and Ottoman facades. The piece de resistance has to be the arched Old Bridge that spans the Neretva at the town’s heart, now meticulously reconstructed following destruction in the Croat–Bosniak conflict and a bearer of that coveted UNESCO tag. And all around this masterpiece cast in stone, Mostar layers Dalmatian builds and Franciscan churches, oriental designs and arabesque mosques into one glorious aesthetic, while gold sellers continue to barter in the Old Bazaar and beer drinkers sip lagers in al fresco terraces by the riverside.

 

7. Jajce

Jajce

Source: flickr

Jajce

Indelibly green and bolstered by the roaring waterfalls that cascade through the urban bluffs at its heart, welcoming Jajce is one of the favoured gateways to the lakes and gorges of the pretty Bosanska Krajina region of the north. Back in the town itself and travelers can discover a clutch of fascinating museums, like the AVNOJ that chronicles the resistance efforts of the Yugoslav partisans in World War Two, underground catacombs, charming Bosnian-style homes dressed in painted timber and – of course – the unmissable citadel that sprawls over the central hill – a remnant of the town’s medieval past.

 

8. Brcko

Brcko

Source: flickr

Brcko

Brcko can be found straddling the borderlands with Croatia to the north, planted on the edge of the Sava River and home to Bosnia’s only real port worthy of note. While the town boasts a smattering of elegant Hapsburg edifices and an endearing blue-collar vibe, the real reason it’s worth a visit is because of its unique position as the country’s only self-governing city, where the various factions that only decades before now were embroiled in the Croat–Bosniak-Serb conflicts mix and forge their own unique enclave and personality on the edge of BiH Federation and the Republika Srpska alike.

 

9. Banja Luka

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Banja Luka

Razed and razed again by both earthquake and war, Banja Luka – the largely unknown capital of the Republika Srpska region of Bosnia and Herzegovina – retains little of the historic Ottoman and Slavic richness it once exuded, save a few reconstructed gems like the Cathedral of Saint Bonaventure and rebuilt, erstwhile-UNESCO Ferhat-Pasha Mosque. However it’s not for the sights that people head to this 200,000-strong city in the wooded Vrbas River valley. No sir, they come to sip beers and get loose to the sounds of the region’s famous thumping electro-folk, sample Trappist wines in the Pivara Banjaluka monastery (the only of its kind in the Balkans) and hit the hiking trails of the mountains on the horizon.

 

10. Kravice Falls

Kravice Falls

Source: flickr

Kravice Falls

A truly photogenic wonder of Bosnia’s backcountry, the Kravice Falls cascade in countless streams over the verdant ridges south of Mostar. More than 25 meters high, the cataracts here attract swimmers and strollers during the summer months, while others will come to simply gawp as the mist rises from the freezing plunge pools and roaring Trebizat River (daring types may also want to try their hand at the on-site rope swing that can be seen depositing fearless locals into the waters). Kravice is best accessed from nearby Ljubuski, while others will rent a car out of Mostar and drive down through the dense fir forests.

 

11. Una National Park

Una National Park

Source: visitbosnia

Una National Park

Shrouded in beautiful swathes of virgin forest, the Una National Park is one of the more recent additions to Bosnia and Herzegovina’s line-up of outdoorsy gems. It makes its home amidst the wild hills that roll down from the Dinaric Alps on the cusp of Croatia, protecting great stretches of riparian woodland and the channels of the Una and Unac Rivers. Visitors who make their way here can look forward to the striking waterfalls at Martin Brod, interesting sights like the soaring Ostrovica Fortress and the newly-reconstructed Rmanj Monastery, complete with its reworking of the Serbian Orthodox style.

 

12. Tuzla

Tuzla

Source: youtube

Tuzla

While Tuzla might not immediately seem like the best place to while away your Bosnian days and its place smack bang in the industrial heartland of the nation might not seem attractive from the get go, this colourful and confident town is actually a great place to feel the pulse of the real, raw BiH. Travelers can delve into a clean and well-pruned old town that comes complete with soaring minarets and stone-clad squares, sunbathe on the edge of curious salt lakes (a remnant of the ancient Pannonian Sea), and experience the country’s most prestigious literary festival with the onset of the Mesa Selimovic event in July.

 

 

 

13. Bihac

Bihac

Source: flickr

Bihac

An endearing little town that sits draped between the ridges of the verdant Una Valley, Bihac comes shrouded in blooming coniferous shades of green and the rugged hills of the Bosanska Krajina. At the town’s centre stands a square-cut medievalist keep and its concomitant church tower, while a series of pop-up islands beset by the turquoise-green channels of the Una itself make for some seriously good urban park strolling. There’s also a pretty new town square to wander through, complete with babbling fountain installations, along with an interesting arabesque Ottoman tomb to boot.

 

14. Blagaj

Blagaj

Source: flickr

Blagaj

A real must on any Bosnian bucket list, Blagaj sits nestled in the depths of a rugged gorge of the Mostar Basin, right on the spot that the Buna River bursts into existence from the subterranean depths below. In fact, the town’s most-visited site sits neatly on the edge of the Buna’s source, rising in beautiful Ottoman styles to form the great Sufi lodge of the Tekija. But that’s not all the town can offer. No sir, there’s elegant Ottoman mansions besides, along with a series of fascinating arched bridges in the Byzantine style and earthy homestays with timber terraces and cosy rooms aplenty.

 

15. Blidinje Nature Park

Blidinje Nature Park

Source: wild-herzegovina

Blidinje Nature Park

This wide plateau that connects the Cvrsnica and Vran peaks in the south-western edge of Bosnia and Herzegovina remains one of the nation’s less-trodden and off-the-beaten-track natural gems. It’s famed for the colossal trunks of its endemic Bosnian pine trees, while it also boasts thick forests where white-bark evergreens shroud a flower-peppered woodland floor. The whole area is also peppered with elaborately carved medieval stele that hearken back to the Orthodox traditions of pre-Ottoman Bosnia. Blidinje comes complete with a web of marked hiking trails that make it a great option for walkers and outdoorsy types.

https://www.thecrazytourist.com/15-best-places-visit-bosnia-herzegovina/

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